Friday, May 28, 2010

AutoCAD Tutorial ~ Introduction to Design Center

Just wanted to let everybody know that I just finished my first AutoCAD video tutorial. it's called: "Introduction to AutoCAD Design Center". My goal for these free AutoCAD tutorials is to provide you with short AutoCAD tutorials that will cover not only the features of AutoCAD, but also how to actually draw projects like floorplans, elevations, etc.

Click on the Play button below
to start the video;

So, enjoy my very first video tutorial, and please feel free to add any comments on how I can improve these videos. Thanks, Kevin


Monday, May 24, 2010

Affordable OnLine AutoCAD Training

In working with, I have completed a 10 hour Introduction to AutoCAD on-line video training tutorial. Not only do you get a great 10 hour AutoCAD video tutorial, you also get access to their entire video library that includes all Microsoft Office programs, accounting tutorials, operating systems, Adobe software, Apple basics, selling on eBay, and programming tutorials.

All this has unlimited access for one low fee of $29.00 a month! This is a great way to get started with some AutoCAD training at a VERY affordable price!

Free trials are available too!

Just click on the image below to get started!


If you have any questions about the AutoCAD tutorial, just send me a note:  Contact Kevin
Good luck on all your projects!

Monday, May 17, 2010

AUGI annouces that the latest issue of AUGIWorld is now available for download.

What's New for 2011? - AUGIWorld writers dive into the newest releases of popular Autodesk products including AutoCAD, Autodesk Inventor, AutoCAD Civil 3D, and Autodesk Revit. You'll learn about all the new features and major enhancements in this year's products.

Monday, May 10, 2010

Guest Post by: Jack Lundee

Green Spaces Provide Great Economic Potential

Some of the more heavily discussed topics of early 2010 include obesity, green infrastructure, clean water, and more. In particular, the addition and/or substitution of green spaces have been quite controversial as of late. Senior resident of Urban Land Institute Ed T. McMahon states "Green space adds value to property." Not only would these areas of conservation drive economic trends upward, but they also improve the overall health of the surrounding community. For example, substituting things like golf courses with conservation areas would essentially increase surrounding property value while diminishing overpriced maintenance fees. The same holds true for airports and other large acre-eating developments.
Some of these areas are already abandoned or unkempt. For instance, park and recreational areas that were once highly visited have become urban wastelands. In an article from the Salt Lake Tribute, Lindsay Whitehurst discusses how an area that was capped with tennis courts to replace an old reservoir had been empty for some time now. She further explains how the University of Utah received a loan to fill the old reservoir and turn the land into a conservation area. Bob Sperling, manager of the water design team for Salt Lake City public utilities, infers high costs when he mentions challenging structural design. Aside from this, safety was a tremendous issue which was later justified when a large piece of slate gave way. It wasn't soon thereafter that it was noticed by Sperling during a routine inspection.

Much larger metropolitan areas are also playing their role in promoting sustainability by implementing many Green Spaces within the city. In Meg Muckenhoupt's new book Boston's Gardens & Green Spaces, she discusses different green space within the city of Boston. With very low cost maintenance fees and little liability, these areas are perfect for protecting our wildlife and the environment. They also attract further tourism; which would in turn generate revenue from ticket/tour sales.
This aligns with the implications of "economic viability" and long term sustainability, posing the question, "Would the substitution of golf courses and airports in the short term lead to an abrupt economic downfall? It's true that this type of architecture provides undoubtedly high revenue. On the contrary, they both come with ridiculously high expenses and maintenance. Incorporating various elements of green architecture implies things like green roofing, which could in turn drive down electrical/gas costs dramatically.
Guest Author:
Jack Lundee